on education

thoughts from a graduate student at the university of mary washington

Reflection: 4 February

February4

The cubing activity that we did on the characteristics of gifted learners was interesting. Being with a group of people I didn’t know that well made it difficult to really follow their thoughts along. I don’t know if that makes any sense, but that’s how I felt while we were doing the activity. There were also a couple of people in the group that really wanted to get their ideas out there, which made it a little harder to focus on my own thoughts about the questions. Even when it was my turn to go, I didn’t even get to answer my own question because somebody else jumped right onto it.

I do like cubing activities and found it to be very useful when I came home and tried a couple for myself. Going over all of the questions in class was helpful too. It certainly helped in synthesizing the abundance of information from all of the reading that we did for this week.

The most helpful of the assigned readings for me were the charts that compared a bright child to a gifted child. Some of the characteristics seem kind of indistinguishable to me, but I’m sure that with time I’ll hone the differences. My confidence was bolstered with the Truths and Myths activity that we did; I only got one or two wrong, which means I’m largely on the right track! Something that surprised me in that activity was that gifted students may need help with study and test taking skills. I definitely figured the opposite would be true, but looking back now, I can see how and why this would be the case. I spent much of my education being taught how to take a test (boring!).

I think that my favorite read for this week was the gifted visual-spatial learner packet. This one really hit home for me because of my autistic son. In trying to figure out how to reach him, I have spent countless hours researching the characteristics of autism (which.. I mean.. good luck, they’re all different from each other). One thing that does seem to be fairly steady among the kids lucky enough to have normal or above normal intellectual capacities is that they are very visual learners. As I kept reading on, I would highlight and star phrases and ideas that reminded me so much of my son. I guess you could say that I ended up making a distracted connection with my text, but I think that reading this piece of literature sent me down the path of researching twice exceptional students. In connecting gifted visual-spatial learners with autistic children, I found that I wanted to know more about what happens when you combine the two since they seem so similar.

posted under EDCI 540
One Comment to

“Reflection: 4 February”

  1. Avatar March 5th, 2014 at 4:27 pm Laurie Abeel Says:

    “Being with a group of people I didn’t know that well made it difficult to really follow their thoughts along. I don’t know if that makes any sense, but that’s how I felt while we were doing the activity. There were also a couple of people in the group that really wanted to get their ideas out there, which made it a little harder to focus on my own thoughts about the questions. Even when it was my turn to go, I didn’t even get to answer my own question because somebody else jumped right onto it.”
    — It sounds like you need more reflection time before you start discussing or answering. There is nothing wrong with that! 🙂 Sometimes we just have to communicate that to the folks we work with. When we discuss creative problem solving, I will go into that a bit more… but it is important to let others know how we think.

    Glad you like the cubing activity!

    “As I kept reading on, I would highlight and star phrases and ideas that reminded me so much of my son. I guess you could say that I ended up making a distracted connection with my text, but I think that reading this piece of literature sent me down the path of researching twice exceptional students. In connecting gifted visual-spatial learners with autistic children, I found that I wanted to know more about what happens when you combine the two since they seem so similar.”
    — There are many similar characteristics. And – there is a great deal of research on gifted autism.


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